Category Archive : World

Treat your employees right, and customers will be satisfied, too

Treat your employees right, and customers will be satisfied, too

When I started my small business, I was committed to treating my employees well.

As an employee, I’d worked for bosses who took their employees for granted, and I knew how de-motivating that could be. I knew that I didn’t want to be that kind of boss.

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Fox Sports' Jason Whitlock blasts LeBron James' parenting, compares fame thirst to cocaine

Fox Sports’ Jason Whitlock blasts LeBron James’ parenting, compares fame thirst to cocaine

Fox Sports commentator Jason Whitlock is not a fan of LeBron James acting exuberantly at his son’s AAU basketball games. On Monday the veteran journalist compared the Los Angeles Lakers star’s parenting to LaVar Ball and correlated James’ “thirst for fame” to cocaine addiction.  

In a segment of “Speak for Yourself,” Whitlock didn’t hold back in criticizing James, who was recently seen dunking in his son Bronny’s pre-game lay-up line and cheering loudly at his son’s championship-sealing dunk.

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Historic Rural Roman Catholic Church

Historic Catholic church in Texas burns to the ground, ATF investigates

A historic 124-year-old Roman Catholic church in a rural Texas farming town that serves 244 families burned to the ground on Monday.

Agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives along with the State Fire Marshal’s Office continued to sift through the rubble and investigate what sparked the fire at the Church of the Visitation in Westphalia. Investigators said there were no injuries.

Insurance adjusters estimated that the damages to the building, said to have been the largest all-wood church in the state, could reach $4 million, KWTX reported. The church was built in 1895 and included some 20 stained-glass windows that had been imported from Germany.

“I am saddened for the people of Westphalia who have suffered this tremendous loss,” Bishop Joe S. Vásquez said, according to a Facebook post by the Diocese of Austin. “I am grateful for all the firefighters and departments that responded to the fire. Please join me in keeping the people of this historic parish in your prayers today as they try to piece together this tragedy.”

The congregation had been planning a celebration for the 125th anniversary of the church, which was constructed around a Latin cross and flanked by bell towers on either side.

All that was saved as the flames consumed the structure was the tabernacle.

The church was accepting donations for rebuilding efforts.

Reference: https://www.foxnews.com/us/texas-catholic-church-burns-to-ground

Nissan to slash 12,500 jobs with an eye toward a turnaround

Nissan to slash 12,500 jobs with an eye toward a turnaround

TOKYO — Nissan is slashing 12,500 jobs or about 9% of its global workforce to cut costs and achieve a turnaround amid tumbling profits, the Japanese automaker said Thursday.

Nissan Motor Co. also said it will cut global production capacity by 10% and reduce model lineups by at least 10% by the end of fiscal 2022.

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Malala Would Have To Remove Her Headscarf To Teach In Quebec: Education Minister

Malala Would Have To Remove Her Headscarf To Teach In Quebec: Education Minister

Quebec’s education minister is facing criticism for tweeting a photo of himself with Nobel Peace Prize recipient Malala Yousafzai after his government banned public employees from wearing headscarves like hers.

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The Latest: Wisconsin sheriff draws a parallel with Closs case

CHIPPEWA FALLS, Wis. (AP) — The Latest on the slayings of four people in weekend attacks at two homes in Wisconsin (all times local):

12:55 p.m.

Authorities in Wisconsin say a man suspected of killing four people may have been imitating the abduction last year of teenager Jayme Closs.

Sheriff Jim Kowalczyk said Tuesday that investigators may never know exactly what led to the Sunday attacks. He says Ritchie German Jr. killed three of his family members and later killed a 24-year-old woman at another home before killing himself.

Kowalczyk says German used a shotgun to blast his way into the woman’s home, and then shot and wounded her parents. Authorities also say German left his car running with items inside that suggested similarities to the Closs case.

They wouldn’t elaborate on those items.

Chief Deputy Chad Holum says if abduction was intended, “it did not work out for him.”

Jayme Closs was abducted from her parents’ home last fall in Barron, just 40 miles (64 kilometers) from the site of the most recent slayings. Jayme’s parents were killed, but she eventually escaped from her abductor.

___

11:43 a.m.

A Wisconsin sheriff says a man suspected in the weekend killings of four people exchanged texts with one of the victims — a woman who apparently didn’t know him.

Chippewa County Sheriff James Kowalczyk (koh-WAHL’-chik) says investigators believe 34-year-old Ritchie German Jr. carried out the Sunday attacks at two homes.

Kowalczyk told The Associated Press on Tuesday that investigators believe German fatally shot his mother, brother and brother’s 8-year-old son at their home in Lafayette before going to a home in nearby Lake Hallie and killing a 24-year-old woman and wounding her parents. German was found dead there, but authorities haven’t said whether he killed himself.

Kowalczyk says German had texted the 24-year-old woman inquiring about a personal relationship, but she texted back saying she didn’t know him.

Reference: https://news.yahoo.com/latest-wisconsin-sheriff-draws-parallel-175731918.html

With $2.1 million price tag, families fight to get the lifesaving drug for babies covered

With $2.1 million price tag, families fight to get the lifesaving drug for babies covered

When the Food and Drug Administration approved Zolgensma, a lifesaving medication to treat spinal muscular atrophy, parents of young children with the rare and fatal disease rejoiced.

But that relief was quickly tempered by the price tag: $2.1 million — the most expensive ever for a single dose of a drug.

“I was pretty shocked,” Sarah Stanger of Monroe, Ohio, said. “You know, as a teacher, we definitely don’t have $2.1 million, and I don’t know anybody who does.”

Stanger’s son, Duke, was diagnosed with the condition as an infant. When Zolgensma was approved in May, doctors said that the medicine was the best option for Duke. But the family’s insurance company refused to pay for it.

Without the drug, Duke’s future is bleak. In babies with SMA, nerve cells in the brain stem and spinal cord that control the muscles needed for speaking, walking, breathing and swallowing are destroyed because a critical protein is missing. As the disease progresses, muscles weaken and atrophy and patients lose their ability to walk, eat or even breathe, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

“Once those neurons die, there’s no reviving them,” Stanger told NBC News. “With no treatment, most children will pass away by age 2.”

When the drug was approved, Novartis, the maker of Zolgensma, said that it expected insurance companies would cover the cost of the treatment. Novartis also said that the high cost of the drug was justified, and the one-time treatment was half the cost of 10 years of treatment with an existing SMA drug.

But Butler Health Plan, the Stangers’ health insurance provider, said that their reasoning for refusing to pay for Zolgensma is that this type of therapy has historically been excluded from coverage. Zolgensma is a type of gene therapy.

“To date, gene therapy … has been excluded from the benefits provided under our health benefit plans,” Stephanie Hearn, executive director at Butler Health Plan, said in an email. That’s because, despite gene therapy’s potential to treat or cure debilitating diseases, the therapies are costly, and health insurance providers still need to figure out how to balance out the cost of these expensive treatments without jeopardizing coverage for the rest of the people on the plan, Hearn wrote.

But that math is going to become increasingly difficult to resolve as time goes on, according to David Mitchell, founder of the advocacy group Patients for Affordable Drugs.

“The situation we’re seeing right now with access to Zolgensma is a problem that will only get worse,” Mitchell said. There are at least 400 other gene therapies in development, and “if they all come to market with prices of $2 million, we won’t be able to afford them as families or as a nation,” he said.

Novartis told NBC News that a “wide range of patients” have had the drug covered by insurance since its approval, but noted that it’s not uncommon for patients to have to go through an appeals process for any new drug.

There may be some hope, however.

Just a few days ago, a major insurance company, UnitedHealthcare, reversed its decision to deny payment for Zolgensma to two children whose cases had received publicity. The company told NBC News that the reversals took place because they had received more information about the cases, not because of media attention.

Ultimately, these cases are yet another example of how the health care system in the United States is failing patients, said Dr. Albert Wu, an internist, and professor of health policy and management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

“It’s an unfortunate reflection of how our health care system is currently working — or not working — that the only way people can get drugs paid for is through a Hail Mary GoFundMe site or by generating enough bad press that the payer feels it isn’t worthwhile to resist,” Wu said.

Florida Education Plan Lacking in Both Promise and Practice

Florida Education Plan Lacking in Both Promise and Practice

NNPA ESSA AWARENESS CAMPAIGN — According to Dr. Rosa Castro Feinberg, who serves on the committee for LULAC Florida, an advocacy group serving all Hispanic nationality groups, Florida’s “current plan includes features that contradict common sense, expert opinion, popular will, and the intent of the ESSA. Contrary to the purposes of the ESSA, the Florida plan denies attention to struggling subgroups of students. Without attention, there can be no correction.”

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Tim Ryan brushes off national-anthem backlash

Tim Ryan called out for not placing a hand on heart for the national anthem at Dem debate

Democratic presidential contender Tim Ryan stood out as the only candidate who didn’t put his hand on his heart during a performance of “The Star-Spangled Banner” at the opening of Tuesday night’s debate in Detroit,  prompting commentators to zing the marginal candidate even before opening statements began.

Ryan, D-Ohio, stood alongside South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, author Marianne Williamson, former Maryland Rep. John Delaney, former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, and Montana Gov. Steve Bullock.

As the national anthem played, Ryan was the only candidate to stand with his hands clasped in front of his body, rather than at his chest.

“Rep. Tim Ryan didn’t put his hand over his heart during the national anthem,” wrote former George W. Bush press secretary and Fox News contributor Ari Fleischer. “I guess he’s appealing to the Kaepernick wing of the Democratic Party.”

Others speculated that Ryan had simply forgotten to place his hand on his heart.

A similar episode is possible at Wednesday night’s debate when another batch of Democratic candidates will take the stage. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee reportedly inquired last week whether “The Star-Spangled Banner” would be played at the debate, prompting speculation as to his plans for the performance.

Ryan, who challenged House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for the role of minority leader in 2016, has struggled to gain momentum. He has sought to appeal primarily to blue-collar voters in the Midwest.

Speaking to Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures” last month, Ryan said the real problem at the southern border is that so many people feel the need to flee their home countries in the first place.

Reference: https://www.foxnews.com/politics/tim-ryan-refuses-to-place-hand-on-heart-for-national-anthem-at-dem-debate

Mexico Crowns Beauty Queen In Bid For Acceptance

MEXICO CITY (AP) — The contestants in the beauty pageant sashayed in red bathing suits, paraded across the stage in evening gowns with plunging necklines and answered questions about climate change and human rights.

After four hours, and a brief protest onstage by a losing contestant, a brunette from the western Mexico state of Colima took the crown. Ivanna Cázares flashed a smile as the announcer declared her Miss Trans Beauty Mexico 2019.

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